Album Reviews: The Yawpers ‘Boy In A Well’

Overall, defining this album by one genre will leave listeners in a state of muddle. The trio often embarks in more pristine sunshine of folky melodies while taking a sharp turn towards menacing rockabilly chops.



Genre: Rock n’ Roll, Americana, punk
Release Date: August 18, 2017
Number of Tracks: 12
Label: Bloodshot Records
Rating:

Purchase: MP3 / CD / Vinyl 


Denver rock n’ roll trio, The Yawpers, aren’t the run-of-the-mill band, nor do they intend to be. Deriving their name from a line from Walt Whitman’s poem, “Song Of Myself,” the trio’s lineup includes Nate Cook (vocals, lead guitar), Jesse Parmet (slide guitar, harmonies), and Noah Shomberg (drums). The odd part of this lineup isn’t so much about the absence of a bass player. It’s the dual acoustic guitars yielding a rather clean blues-driven country-punk soundscape.

Their third full-length album, Boy In A Well, follows up 2015’s American Man and is the group’s second to be released via Bloodshot Records. It infuses two very distinct styles that they seem to transition between. “Armistice Day,” “A Visitor Is Welcomed” and “Room with a View” embody the singer/songwriter approach of classic Americana and folk. But most of this album assumes a rockabilly landscape with a tinge of blues and early bluegrass. And on “Mon Dieu,” “Mon Nom” and “Face to Face to Face,” Cook’s vocals resemble the likes of Lux Interior (The Cramps) and Buddy Holly.

Nestled within in the 12 songs are a few stray tracks. “No Going Back” is driven 60’s surf drums and bright guitar riffs. Similarly “Linen for the Orphan” is a raunchy surf-rock track with brash lead guitars and higher-pitched vocals. Overall, defining this album by one genre will leave listeners in a state of muddle. The trio often embarks in more pristine sunshine of folky melodies while taking a sharp turn towards menacing rockabilly chops.


Stream “Mon Dieu,” “Reunion” and “Mon Nom” below:





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